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Rooting of the Android operating system has changed a lot over the years. As the official Android developers have continually built road blocks, the rooting community has frequently taken them down one by one. Rooting the Android operating system is still a popular thing to do today. Sure, some of the root applications that were popular to use years ago aren’t as useful today, but there is still a bunch that are.

There are a lot of tools out there for people to choose from when it comes to rooting. It isn’t just about installing SuperSU from a custom recovery image or whatever one click rooting tool you can find that works anymore. We now have tools that come with unique features that are beginning to dictate what people should install.

Using KingRoot Instead of SuperSU or Magisk

KingRoot is predominantly a one-click rooting tool where you don’t flash it from a custom recovery image but rather just directly from within the application itself. If there is another one-click rooting tool out there that can root your device, then you can use it just the same. The problem for most people is that it has become quite confusing trying to work out what one-click tool would work outside of the CF-Auto-Root tool which is a tool that is mainly only available for Samsung smartphones and tablets with a few exceptions.

The other option that you can go for is installing the SuperSU. You need to unlock the bootloader most of the time and then install a custom recovery image before you can then flash the SuperSU, but as long as there is a custom recovery image made available, then SuperSU pretty much is a perfect tool that you can always rely on. You just need to make sure you flash the right version (whether you need the systemless root version or not.) SuperSU is pretty easy to track down. There is always a new one for each version of Android, or if you have a newer device, then you can go to the SuperSU download page that Chainfire has setup that offers the latest version available from the download link.

SuperSU fell out of favor with lots of people recently for its inability to allow for things like Android Pay. The Android developers made it so that if you rooted with SuperSU, you couldn’t use Android Pay because of a new SafetyNet feature designed to catch these rooting tools (even that now use the systemless root) and prevent them from working to make sure that the Android operating system stays as secure as possible while people make their Android Pay transactions. People then waited a long time for a rooting method to become available where Android Pay would work, but it never came. In more recent times though, Chainfire did come up with a solution that is called SUHide. The SUHide can hide the SuperSU so that it doesn’t trip SafetyNet and you can run applications like Android Pay or even Netflix. However, there is also another tool out there called Magisk that does a similar thing, but instead of hiding the root access it allows you to toggle it on or off whenever you please (said to be the simpler solution.) So, if you want to be able to use Android Pay, then you should try out either SuperSU and SUHide or Magisk. Simply put, to this day, the KingRoot tool will not work for you with Android Pay, but there are other alternatives out there that will.

Downloading and Installing KingRoot Android 8.0 Oreo to Root your Android

Downloading the KingRoot tool is very simple and is explained in the guide below, but first, you need to take care of one thing before you do it. The Android operating system allows for the installation of applications from the Google Play Store quickly and easily. Everything located outside of the Google Play Store poses more of a potential security risk because Google isn’t managing it. If you want to install applications from outside of the Google Play Store, you first need to enable a setting called “Unknown Sources” from the Android operating system’s Settings. Since the KingRoot application is located outside of the Google Play Store, you need to do that now. You can enable it by heading to the Menu > Settings > Security and then toggling the switch on for the “Unknown Sources” option.

Now that you can install apps from outside of Google Play, it’s time to get KingRoot installed. To do that, open your favorite web browser application from your Android operating system (most people use the default Google Chrome app) and then type “KingRoot.net” into the browser’s address bar and then tap on the Enter button so the website loads. Alternatively, you can download the KingRoot APK files from these direct links.

You now have the official KingRoot website open on your mobile browser. It automatically detects when you visit it from an Android operating system so all you need to do is scroll down a little bit and then you’ll see the big green button that says “Download APK for Android” that you now need to tap. It’ll download the version of KingRoot that works for Android 8.0 Oreo.

You’ll now see a notice letting you know that “this file type can harm your device.” It’s perfectly normal to get that warning, and because this is a file we trust, it’s nothing to worry about, you need to click on the “OK” button at the bottom of the screen.

KingRoot then gives you the information regarding what it is going to get access to on your device after you have agreed to install it. As usual, you don’t have much of a choice: it’s either you agree to these conditions, or you don’t install it, but at least you can choose to back out from installing still if you wish. Just click on the “Cancel” button if you want to back out of it or the “Install” button if you want to continue with the installation of the KingRoot application.

Swipe down from the top of the device’s display, so you bring down the notification shade and then click on the link that says “New KingRoot version” to open your file that has finished downloading but has not yet been installed.

Now KingRoot begins to install on your device.

Most Android versions running on 8.0 Oreo will give you a message saying that the installation has been blocked. Don’t click on the “OK” button or it will direct you out of the installation process. Instead, what you need to do is click on the little arrow next to where it says “More details” and then it gives you the option to continue with the installation from there.

Tap on the “Install anyway (unsafe)” link at the bottom of the More details section to continue with the installation.

The KingRoot app is now installed. The only thing left to do is open it up by tapping on the “Open” button in the bottom right corner of your device’s display.

Your Android mobile that is running on the Android 8.0 Oreo software updates should now be rooted after using the KingRoot one-click rooting tool. The KingRoot tool lets you know that it was successful or not from the application’s screen, but you don’t need to take their word for it before you start installing root applications. Once the device has rebooted, you can install the root checker application for additional confirmation that has no associations with KingRoot at all. You can use that same root checker app regardless of what tool you used to get root access. It’s also handy to leave installed on your device in case one day you want to unroot it before sending it off for repair under warranty or something of that nature. That way you’ll know that you have successfully unrooted it as well when it lets you know that your device is no longer rooted.

The KingRoot tool can install all the same root applications like any other rooting tool can. Most of the root applications you’ll find available to download from the same Google Play Store that you have always used for installing your regular applications that don’t require root access. The apps that don’t require root to run can often be showcased on the front page, so you know what apps are cool and trending; none of that type of thing happens with the root apps, though, so you’ll need to know the names of the ones that you want to install before venturing into the Google Play Store to download them. We’ve compiled a bunch of what we think are the best root applications for Android that you can check out to get some ideas if you like.

When people go looking for the KingRoot tool, they usually find the version that’s available for Android—it’s quicker to use and a tad bit easier, too. However, it’s important to note that there is, in fact, a version that is available to use on Windows operating systems as well as a desktop application. The Windows PC version of the KingRoot tool has a higher success rate, so if your device isn’t rooted after using the Android application version, you should give the version made for Windows a try instead and see how to goes.

There are no guarantees that KingRoot will work for everyone—the tool is only made to work for smartphones and tablets that are made by either Samsung, HTC, Google, LG, and Huawei. If you have a device that is made by any other manufacturer, then it’s not likely to work, and you’ll need to find another rooting method instead. Notwithstanding, there are some things you can try just in case KingRoot can work for your device, so long as it isn’t due to one of the known issues that prevent KingRoot from working.

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