Mozilla Firefox (or simply Firefox) is a free and open-source web browser developed by The Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, Mozilla Corporation. Firefox is available for Windows, macOS, Linux, BSD, illumos and Solaris operating systems. Its sibling, Firefox for Android, is also available. Firefox uses the Gecko layout engine to render web pages, which implements current and anticipated web standards. In 2017, Firefox began incorporating new technology under the code name Quantum to promote parallelism and a more intuitive user interface. An additional version, Firefox for iOS, was released on November 12, 2015. Due to platform restrictions, it uses the WebKit layout engine instead of Gecko, as with all other iOS web browsers.

The Mozilla Firefox web browser claims to be currently 30% lighter than Google Chrome on Speedometer 2.0 benchmark — a modern way of evaluating web browser speed. Firefox also comes with tracking protection. Tracking Protection is a new privacy technology to mitigate invasive tracking of users’ online activity by blocking requests to tracking domains. We evaluate our approach and demonstrate a 67.5% reduction in the number of HTTP cookies set during a crawl of the Alexa top 200 news sites since Firefox does not download and render content from tracking domains. Tracking Protection also enjoys performance benefits of a 44% median reduction in page load time and 39% reduction in data usage in the Alexa top 200 news sites.

Firefox comes with lots of settings that can be adjusted from the menu. Over time you may wish to reset them to the default and go back to the way Firefox was originally designed instead of using it with the customizations you had added.

Tips for Avoiding Malware in the Future

If you have malware on your computer, you can always install an antimalware program and run a scan to try to remove it. But some experts suggest that even if you do that, it is not a given that all malware can be removed—once it gets access to your system, it might not ever get taken away.

So naturally, that means you should try preventing the malware from getting on your computer in the first place.

Here are some of the most common ways you can avoid getting malware on your PCs:

  • Be careful what you download. Some websites are far more likely to have malware on them than others. If you are using a reliable web browser, it should already give you decent protection by alerting you to sites that may be harmful—do not ignore those warnings. What’s more, try not to visit any websites that you think may be untrustworthy: torrenting sites can be beneficial, and the founders are not necessarily evil, but you need to remember that random people around the world are uploading those files. Torrenting sites are some of the most notorious for malware for this reason—not everyone is interested in helping you download free files without them getting something in return. Often that return comes in the form of malware tucked away within the files you download, thinking that they’re only movies.
  • Install (full paid versions of) third-party antimalware programs. If your operating system is not protecting you well enough from malware threats, you ought to look into third-party programs. They will not always protect you in real-time for free, but the paid versions often do. That means if the program detects the file you are about to download is malware, it will let you know about it with a warning. At this stage, Microsoft Windows does not automatically block potentially unwanted programs, so third-party protection for malware is still very useful.
  • Keep all data and personal information safe. Malware only becomes a problem if it gets its hands on whatever it is looking for. Simply being on your computer is not necessarily the end of the world; it is what it does from that position of power that counts. Look into ways of keeping your data safe, such as using file encryption. Windows 10 comes with EFS for encrypting individual files and also BitLocker encryption for the full disk.
  • Keep your software up to date. It does not matter what software you have; if it is outdated, then it may also be insecure. Simply being old software does not necessarily open up new doorways for vulnerabilities; rather, new updates potentially close old vulnerabilities. If you know there are no vulnerabilities, your software is fine to continue using. However, if vulnerabilities are found, updates are critical. If you do not want to follow the news every day, it is best just to keep updating and know that you are safe. That means keeping up to date with your operating systems updates as well. If using Windows, keep Windows Update installing those updates that give you fresher OS versions.
  • Keep networks secure. All your computers (desktops, laptops, smartphones), and other peripherals such as printers, when connected to WiFi, are often connected to the same network. You need to make sure that the network is secured with a password. Otherwise, your WiFi connection will be open. The best security today is with WPA or WPA2 encryption. You typically do not have much to worry about here, as it is automatically implemented by your WiFi provider. But make sure it stays that way. 
  • Do not use open WiFi. You have heard the warning: stay away from that open WiFi you get at airports, unless you need it. The idea behind this warning is because it is open, it also means people with malicious intent also have easy access to it; thus, the information on your smartphones, tablets, and laptops is not going to be safe.

The following tutorial demonstrates how to reset the Mozilla Firefox to its default settings.

How to Reset Firefox to Its Default Settings

Here is how you can reset the browser settings from the More menu in Firefox:

1. Click on the More button and then click on the Help link. (click to enlarge screenshot below)

2. Click on the Troubleshooting Information link. (click to enlarge screenshot below)

3. Click on the Refresh Firefox button. (click to enlarge screenshot below)

4. Click on the Refresh Firefox button when you get the confirmation dialog box.

You can now close the Firefox settings and continue using your web browser with the default settings restored.

That’s all.